On Friday, November 17, 6:30-8:30pm, LAB presents a night of reading, photography and costume design. “Masks of the Quotidien” is a collaboration by three female Brazilian artists working in literature and the visual arts: QAF Award winner Camila Santos, VIviane Aquino, and Keka Marzagao. The project aims to break the stereotypes that surround Brazilian women living in Queens: their life stories and experiences as immigrants. The monologues will be read by actresses alongside an exhibition of the masks and photographs. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask the artists questions about their creative processes.

Friday, November 17, 6:30-8:30pm

Queens Council on the Arts
37-11 35th Ave, Entrance on 37th St
Astoria, NY 11101

Admission $10

Viviane Aquino is a Brazilian costume designer and photographer. She holds a B.S. in Journalism and Public Relations from Brazilian university UNICAP. In 2013, she completed FIT’s Fashion Art and Design & Costume Design program. She lives in Astoria, Queens.

Viviane Aquino is a Brazilian costume designer and photographer. She holds a B.S. in Journalism and Public Relations from Brazilian university UNICAP. In 2013, she completed FIT’s Fashion Art and Design & Costume Design program. She lives in Astoria, Queens.

Keka Marzagao is a Brazilian-born portrait photographer working at the intersection of documentary and fiction. In her work, she longs to capture an impression of what connects us to each other as well as a glimpse of herself. She is fascinated by the human condition and strives to pursue what Toni Morrison calls the 'human project—-which is to remain human and to block the dehumanization of others.'

Keka Marzagao is a Brazilian-born portrait photographer working at the intersection of documentary and fiction. In her work, she longs to capture an impression of what connects us to each other as well as a glimpse of herself. She is fascinated by the human condition and strives to pursue what Toni Morrison calls the 'human project—-which is to remain human and to block the dehumanization of others.'

Camila M. Santos received her MFA in Creative Writing and Literary Translation from Queens College. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Words Without Borders, Three Percent and Minola Review. Camila is currently at work on a novel about Brazilian immigrants living in the United States. She is originally from Recife, Brazil.

Camila M. Santos received her MFA in Creative Writing and Literary Translation from Queens College. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Words Without Borders, Three Percent and Minola Review. Camila is currently at work on a novel about Brazilian immigrants living in the United States. She is originally from Recife, Brazil.